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Take Back Australia … Reject Socialism

The 2012 agenda of the Communist Party of Australia.

Communist_Australians

We need to take not of what is being said.  They have confirmed where they have been active, and where they will be ramping up their campaign. 

The Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU) is waging a campaign for job security. The number of workers employed as casuals, in fixed or short-term contracts, labour hire, and contracting has almost doubled in the last two decades. Around 40 percent of the workforce now face all the difficulties of low or uncertain income, lack of access to bank loans and other social and economic problems associate with job insecurity.

The building and construction division of the CFMEU, despite over $6 million in fines over the past two years, has not given up its fight to unionise construction sites and defend the safety, jobs, wages and conditions of its members. The Maritime Union of Australia has not backed off on the waterfront. The public sector unions have taken the fight to defend jobs and services to the streets.

Individual trade unions are to varying degrees of success recruiting new members and fighting their battles as they arise. These struggles tend to be isolated, putting out small fires, and sometimes making some small gains where possible.

These and other struggles are indicative of a growing preparedness to fight back, but the trade union movement as a whole is still far from strong enough to meet the challenges ahead and cannot do so on its own.

One of the key challenges in 2012 is the building and strengthening of the labour movement, not just in numbers and organisation but also ideologically so that it can take on the broader economic, social, ideological and political struggles as well as provide solidarity in the smaller more localised battles.

There is also an urgent need to take up a broad and united struggle for jobs, for public services, for an expansionary budget that serves the people, to halt corporate tax cuts, to improve social security, increase the age pension.

It cannot be left to the nurses to fight for public hospitals, for teachers to defend public education, manufacturing unions for manufacturing sector jobs, building unions for trade union rights, pensioners for a pension increase, the unemployed for their rights, etc. As the trade union saying goes: “An injury to one is an injury to all.”

The Your Rights @ Work campaign that brought together trade unions, left and progressive forces and members of the community provides an excellent model for building a broad united front in defence of workers’ rights, living standards, the public sector, small farmers and businesses. It saw the back of the Howard government, and such a movement could be used to build a pro-people, political alternative.

The present two-party system, in which government is alternately shared between the Liberal-National Party Coalition and the Australian Labor Party, is not serving the people.

The Communist Party of Australia (CPA) has set as one of its priorities for 2012 the important task of building the Party. The CPA believes there is a way to overcome Australia’s economic and social problems. To do this it is necessary to change the direction of politics in Australia and, eventually, to replace the capitalist system with a socialist one.

The Communist Party is a party of activists who work in trade unions, peace and environmental groups, solidarity organisations and a variety of other community movements as well as running campaigns in the name of the Communist Party.

The members of the CPA work to eliminate unemployment, poverty, injustice, homelessness, racism and war. These problems arise from the domination of our society by huge profit-hungry private corporations.

What better New Year’s resolution than to join us, or at least find out more about us, perhaps send a donation of support and take out a subscription to The Guardian.”

http://www.cpa.org.au/guardian/2012/1532/01-make-2012-the-year-of-struggle.html

02/02/2012 Posted by | Uncategorized | 1 Comment